laughterkey

dailydot:

Starz’ appeal to Internet fandom makes perfect sense, because the Outlander books have always inspired a passionate following of fan clubs and discussion forums. The TV series is definitely something that people will become obsessed with, rather than simply tuning in and enjoying every week like Downton Abbey.

Unfortunately, this media strategy is more than a little ironic once you know about Diana Gabaldon’s attitude toward fandom.

The problem is, Diana Gabaldon really doesn’t like fanfiction.

 in 2010, she wrote a blog post on the topic of fanfiction, saying, “I think it’s immoral, I know it’s illegal, and it makes me want to barf whenever I’ve inadvertently encountered some of it involving my characters.” She goes on to compare fanfiction to seducing her husband or breaking into her home.

This post was quickly deleted, but not before being saved and reposted by many fans due to the furore it caused. Fan writers are happy to keep their fanfiction private and separate from its original inspiration, but nobody reacts well to being told their hobby is disgusting and wrong. This was the worst way anyone could break the fourth wall between fans and creators.

On another occasion, Gabaldon wrote that “99% of [fanfiction] is Just Awful, and it’s revolting to see your characters being made to do and say idiotic things, or be forced to enact simple-minded sex fantasies (which is what most fan-fic that comes to my unwilling attention is).  Like someone selling your children into white slavery.” 

This all makes a lot less sense once you learn that Gabaldon has admitted on several occasions that her inspiration came from Doctor Who. Specifically, the time-traveling 18th century Scotsman Jamie McCrimmon, played by Frazer Hines. The male protagonist of the Outlander series is, of course, named Jamie Fraser. It’s easy to argue that Outlander is a kind of fanfiction itself, or at least it began that way.

[NEVER FORGET!]

fancybidet

fancybidet:

brainybra:

victorias secret like doesn’t carry that many sizes, they go from 32-38 (they have some 40) band size, which is only four sizes, and they go from A-DD which is only another five cup sizes. and like, let me tell you, I have fit very few women that were actually under a D cup. and the thing about VS is that if they don’t have your size, they’ll put you in something “similar.” a woman came in, and VS put her in a 38 DD. she was a 30H. that is five band sizes too large, and four cup sizes off. they put her in that because cup changes with band, and so they thought it would fit her. well it contained her. but she was bubbling out of her cups, and the band was obviously way too loose, and because nothing fit right, the underwires were tilting and bruising her sternum. 

like don’t go to victorias secret okay. i have met very few people that can actually shop there. and before you say “i can’t find cute bras anywhere else!”  I promise you, you can, send me your size and I will link you to lots of cute bras. Google “bra boutique [your city]” and get properly measured and buy some cute bras that actually fit you.

For my non-deathfat bra-wearing babes.

impuretale

greenthepress:

This is a story that needs to be shared. 

Fossil fuel money backs the Heartland Institute, which has been working to dismantle the teaching of global warming in public schools.

This latest development shows how far they’re willing to go to push their anti-science education agenda. 

subtlegaysubtext replied to your chat “My stomach is cramping again.”

Hey we match! None of those things worked for me either! Weeee! Sorry you’re not feeling well *hugs*

Thanks! I have two bottles of the bentyl but it has never done anything.

I’m actually getting kind of pissed off at my GI. I’ve called like 4 times, I’ve been in to the office, I had an ultrasound, etc. and the answer the nurse gives me is “have you tried a heating pad?” which is just bullshit. 

I feel like they aren’t even trying to see if anything else might work.

skeptikhaleesi
socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.